Mountain Bikes

Mountain Bikes

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Month: February 2018

Accessories For Your Mountain Bike

Posted on February 18, 2018 in Uncategorized

There is a massive range of accessories available for mountain bikes and it is possible to spend as much as you did on the bike. But a lot of the accessories are gimmicks and are not needed for typical mountain biking. There are, however, some mountain bike accessories that are essential.

Helmet

This is the most obvious accessory for mountain biking. It is advisable for any cyclist to wear a helmet and it is particularly important if you are going to be mountain biking. It is common to fall off your bike when mountain biking off road and the surface can be unforgiving. A good solid helmet is necessary to protect you head from any impact with the ground, trees or rocks.

Cycle Shorts

Mountain biking on rough bumpy roads is very hard on the body. It is very common for cyclists to have a sore bottom after a hard days mountain biking. A good pair of cycle shorts will help absorb some of the impact.

Gloves

For the same reason as above, gloves are an important part of your mountain bike kit. A lot of people overlook gloves, but they do absorb a significant amount of the shock that travels up through the handlebars. Gloves with gel padding are the best ones to buy for mountain biking.

Other Clothing

If you are going to be out in the countryside for a day, or even half a day, make sure you protect yourself from the weather. A lightweight waterproof jacket is needed in case of rain. An outer layer is a good idea on hot sunny days to protect your skin from the harmful sunrays.

Repair kit

Mountain bikes are prone to breaking down when you least expect it. A basic repair kit is a great mountain bike accessory to own and can be a real lifesaver. This should contain a puncher repair kit, allen key, screw driver (to adjust the front and rear derailleur) and a pump. Other equipment includes a spoke tool, spanners and a bottom bracket tool. Of course, a lubricant is essential!

Cleaning equipment

Mountain biking can be a dirty sport and bikes tend to not like dirt! So the right cleaning equipment is required to keep your mountain bike in good working order. It is possible to buy stray that will degrease your gears. A small brush is often necessary to remove the stubborn dirt.

Bike bottles and cages

Make sure you carry plenty of liquid when mountain biking. You should buy a cage to hold a water bottle. If it will fit, two cages is a good idea so that you can carry extra liquid.

Cycle lights

If you are going to do any cycling at night, you will need lights. There is no point taking the risk, as it is easy for cars to not see you.

Lock

If you are going to leave your mountain bike unattended for any length of time, then you will need a lock. Of course this depends on where you live, but in most places, bikes are stolen on a frequent basis. You can get locks that come with a guarantee against breaking.

Summary

Mountain biking is a fantastic form of exercise and can be enjoyed by most people. With the right mountain bike and accessories, you will have the time of your life.

Mountain Bike Reviews – Finding a Trustworthy Source

Posted on February 17, 2018 in Uncategorized

When you are ready to purchase a mountain bike, if you are like most mountain bikers, you start reading mountain bike reviews. You may have found, however, that not all mountain bike reviews are accurate – or even honest! The fact of the matter is that some dealers and even manufacturers actually pay people to write good reviews – of bikes that the reviewer has never even had the opportunity to ride!

There are countless sites that carry reviews of various mountain bikes. Some of the sites are very dependable and others simply cannot be counted on. It’s hard for the average mountain biker to know who to believe – beginner bikers who have yet to make their first mountain bike purchase don’t stand a chance!

If you are looking for reviews, stick to the sites and publications that can be counted on for accurate and valuable information. Most print publications have accurate reviews. When reading one of these reviews, it is important to look on the edges of the page for very tiny print that says ‘advertisement.’ If you see that, you can be sure that this is not a real review you are reading. It is an advertisement disguised as a review. Its purpose is to get you to buy the bike – not to point out both the pros and the cons! Move on!

When looking for reviews online, stick to the better known online magazines such as Singletrack, GearHead, Mountain Bike Review, and Mountain Bike. These are the online magazines that will give you the most accurate information in terms of reviews. You will also find the latest mountain biking news, as well as quite a bit of information on races and trails. These four websites are vitally important to serious bikers.

Of course the best reviews are the ones that you get from other bikers, in person. When you see a mountain biker on the trail riding a bike that you are interested in, take the time to talk to them. Tell them that you are planning to purchase that particular bike, and ask them what they like about it, and what they don’t like. Find groups of mountain bikers in the parks, and try to talk to them when they are taking a break. This way, you won’t be interfering with their ride, and you can get several different ‘in person’ reviews.

Ask as many questions as you possibly can – but try not to keep irritate them by keeping them from enjoying their ride. After speaking with them – or before – sit back and watch them ride. You aren’t watching their technique – although that may be interesting – what you want to watch for is how well the bike handles. Seeing the bike in action is the second best review that you can possibly have – the first best review you can get is your very own review!

As your interest in a particular bike grows, you will want to try one out for yourself. You can test ride bikes that are for sale in bike shops, but you can’t really put them through the motions well enough in a ‘test ride’ situation to learn what you need to know. Your best option is to test ride a friend’s bike. Take it out for a day, and see what it can do in relation to what you can do with it. Give it a great workout, and by the end of the day, you will know enough about the bike to write your very own review.

Do your part in the mountain biking community by contributing your own reviews to the websites that allow consumers to submit mountain bike reviews. Be clear in your writing, and honest in your opinions. Make sure that you have your facts straight, and be sure that you distinguish between opinion and fact! You will be doing many other mountain bikers a huge favor by submitting your honest – and accurate – mountain bike review!

How I Got Into Mountain Biking

Posted on February 16, 2018 in Uncategorized

It was a humid Saturday morning as I had one foot clipped into my mountain bike while there must have been thirty of us lined up onto the starting line of this 15 mile mountain bike race. As I stood there I glanced over at the other competitors, some of whom had what looked like a ball of fire in their eyes while others had ripped leg muscles. They all sat onto their bikes, some of witch were carbon fiber bikes, hard tail and full suspension bikes and even a few 29ers. Here I am with only a year of experience riding on single track trails with my Trek full suspension mountain bike as I tried to keep myself pumped up for what could potentially be a very grueling race. Before the gunshot was heard, I kept my hands relaxed on the handle bar grips, only letting go to make sure my gloves were on tight, my helmet was adjusted properly and I took a few sips from the Camelbak hydration system that was strapped to me. Once the gun went off and was heard all over the mountain bike park, we were all in a dash to leave the starting line while clipping in and jockeying for position like a herd of wild animals as we made our way from the open field and into the single track trails. As I kept changing gears, looking around at the riders in front of me and thinking about what I would encounter during the race, I had a thought in the back of my mind.

I thought about what led me to buy a mountain bike, how long would it take before I would become confident enough to ride through rugged terrain, switchback trails and steep hills. Could this new sport help me out in the other endurance sports that I compete in?

With the background of a distance runner, and a triathlete, mountain biking would definitely benefit me. A little more than a year and a half before this race, a friend convinced me to buy an inexpensive hard tail mountain bike to participate in group rides in the winter time where we would be doing a lot hill repeats on a twenty mile loop on pavement. These workouts would keep us in shape through the winter so we would all be better off for the upcoming triathlon season. Once springtime rolled around and I wanted to get into ridding on single track trails that offer switchbacks, rugged terrain and steep hills, I realized that the bike that I currently had was inadequate for this type of ridding. So then I found myself buying a Trek full suspension mountain bike. The more I rode my new bike at the local mountain bike parks, the more I appreciated having an intermediate level bike. He way the dual suspension was forgiving on the terrain of the trails along with how well the tires gave me enough traction through the different trail conditions were just a couple of key features that I began to appreciate about this bike. As I rode my mountain bike on the easy and intermediate trails, I not only realized that I was turning into a better mountain biker, I noticed something else along the way. When I was not making my way though the local mountain bike parks, I was out on the road on my triathlon bike. What I found out about mountain biking is that it forces you to become very good at being able to handle your bike in all different situations. It is that same requirement in mountain biking that made me more confident when riding on road, especially through a village where there are a lot of cars, traffic lights, potholes and other various problems that a cyclist has to be aware of. At the time, while I was still becoming acclimated to this bike that I had bought, I knew that sometime in the future I would like to try a mountain bike race. I also knew that I would have to become a much better mountain biker at this new discipline before I try to do it at a competitive level. I soon found myself waking up very early on a September morning to join a of friends on what was going to be a sixty mile ride on our bikes. We would ride the first thirty five miles on a flat trail and then stop for breakfast and then the fun would really begin. Then twenty five miles of singe track trails and see who could endure the most pain. As the leaves fell off the trees and the snow blanketed the ground, there was yet another opportunity for me. Mountain biking on the snow packed trails while breathing the dry air and trying not to let my tires lose their grip in the snow. Eventually in the middle of the summer, I found myself on vacation visiting a friend in Massachusetts near the New Hampshire border and we mountain biked at various parks in the area. My friend and I rode in parks that offered an endless amount of rocks, boulders, roots, logs, man made bridges over creeks and even a few mosquitoes! At this time I was confident enough in my bike handling that I had registered for my first mountain bike race.

Now here I was in the first of four laps in this grueling mountain bike race while I was thinking about how I got into the sport instead of thinking about the race itself. I was quickly getting exhausted while I tried to keep up with the more experienced athletes in this race. With beads of sweat already dripping down my face and realizing that my mental toughness was slowly fading away, this discipline was beginning to feel a lot harder than distance running and competing in triathlons. I found myself on trails that meandered through the park as well as steep climbs, a few rollers, roots, logs, some rocks and then an open field to have a chance to gain speed. Overall I didn’t finish as well as I wanted to, but I plan to compete in more mountain bike races in the future. With the various mountain bike parks around the country, this is a very rewarding sport for a beginner to get into as well as an experienced mountain biker. Both types of mountain bikers will still reap the benefits and enjoyment, while continuously trying to push themselves past their comfort zone.

This is how I got into the sport of mountain biking. This is a sport where I have not only learned a lot about the sport itself, but also about myself as an athlete. I’m sure after reading this you are ready to go out and buy a bike or if you already have a mountain bike, dust it off and take it out to the trails.

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